Recordings

Making Global Connections


2023-24 Event Recordings

KHC-NEH Lecture
Uncomfortable Histories: From Nazi Book Burnings to Contemporary Book Bans
Recorded on February 14, 2024
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Join us for a conversation about the erasure of uncomfortable histories, beginning with an overview of the 1933 Nazi book burnings as part of Adolf Hitler’s plan to “cleanse” public discourse and participate in an “Action Against the Un-German Spirit.” Within this nationalist framework, our speakers will address the current drive to ban, censor, and eliminate texts from libraries and schools. Featuring Dr. Christina Dobbs, Assistant Professor and Program Director for English Education at Boston University and Dr. Eileen Chanza Torres, Associate Professor of English at Westminster University of Salt Lake City.

This event is part of the 2023-24 Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Colloquium, “Weaponizing the Past: Art, History and the Rhetoric of National Greatness.”

Holocaust Memory/International Holocaust Remembrance Day Commemoration
The Evian Conference and the Refugee Crisis: 85 Years Later 
Recorded on January 24, 2024
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In July 1938, international diplomats from 32 countries gathered in Evian-les-Bain, France to discuss the growing crisis of German and Austrian Jewish refugees fleeing persecution in the Reich. In commemoration of International Holocaust Remembrance Day, Dr. Diane Afoumado, Chief of the Holocaust Survivors and Victims Resource Center at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, discusses the significance of the Evian Conference’s 85th anniversary. This talk was a collaboration between Queensborough Community College’s Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and New York City College of Technology (City Tech)’s Ursula C. Schwerin Library in support of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s traveling exhibition, “Americans and the Holocaust” which examines how Americans reacted to Nazism, war, refugees, and genocide before and during the Second World War.  

KHC & New York City College of Technology (City Tech) Partnership
Racism, Eugenics & Antisemitism: Connections between Jim Crow and the Nuremberg Race Laws
Recorded on November 30, 2023
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Hitler and the Nazis looked to the US’s eugenics movement, Jim Crow laws, and culture of white supremacy in their quest to racialize European Jews, a policy that was first enshrined in the 1935 Nuremberg Race Laws. Join us for a conversation about the legal and political influences of America’s racial terrorism upon the Nazi’s genocidal policies featuring Tom White, Coordinator of Educational Outreach at the Cohen Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Keene State College. This talk was a collaboration between Queensborough Community College’s Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and New York City College of Technology (City Tech)’s Ursula C. Schwerin Library in support of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s traveling exhibition, “Americans and the Holocaust” which examines how Americans reacted to Nazism, war, refugees, and genocide before and during the Second World War.   

Holocaust Memory/Annual Kristallnacht Commemoration
2023 Kristallnacht Commemoration: The State of Holocaust Education in the US Today
Recorded on November 9, 2023
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With antisemitism on the rise around the world, the demand for Holocaust education has become even more pressing. About half of the states in the US have mandated Holocaust education while museums and academic programs alike continue to expand their outreach to include other genocides and human rights issues. Yet, questions remain. Are these strategies working? Are they enough? How should Holocaust education relate to other forms of discrimination? Should we adjust our expectations? On the anniversary of the Kristallnacht pogrom that took place November 9 and 10, 1938, join us for a conversation about the state of Holocaust education featuring Dr. Oren Stier, Professor of Religious Studies and Director of the Holocaust & Genocide Studies Program in the Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs at Florida International University. 

KHC-NEH Lecture – Virtual Event
Archives of Nostalgia: Exploring America’s Many Pasts
Recorded on November 1, 2023
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How do archival collections and their commercialization frame contemporary American narratives of belonging? Join us for this roundtable discussion examining the archives of nostalgic American pasts, including memorabilia related to antebellum, postwar affluence, and idealized suburbia. The conversation features Dr. Erin Thompson, Professor of Art Crimes at John Jay College of Criminal Justice-CUNY; Dr. Tim Keogh, Assistant Professor of History at Queensborough Community College (QCC)-CUNY; and Irvin Weathersby Jr., Lecturer of English at QCC-CUNY.

Human Rights and the Museum Series
Building and Sustaining Indigenous Cultural Institutions of Today
Recorded on October 24, 2023
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At a moment when museum professionals and cultural workers are questioning the structures and founding principles of older museums and cultural institutions that came out of earlier colonial contexts, this program looks at the more recent history of one organization which are largely dedicated to serving Indigenous populations. Join Jeremy Dennis, Photographer and Founder of Ma’s House for this timely discussion about how this site has made an impact on our local and national communities, as well as its broader connections to the work of Holocaust education museums.  

KHC & US Holocaust Memorial Museum Partnership/Holocaust Education
Integrating Holocaust Education into the Community College Classroom
Recorded on October 13, 2023
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In this workshop, learn why a foundation in Holocaust education is vital to making connections between the past and the present, and how to do so addressing the unique needs of community college students. The program includes a discussion with faculty across various disciplines who have developed related pedagogy, an exploration of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s (USHMM) online resources, an introduction to the unique local resources of the Kupferberg. Holocaust Center, and a practical educator demo of these resources by a USHMM Museum Teacher Fellow.

KHC & QCC Welcome Read Partnership
Creating John Lewis’s March III: A Conversation with Nate Powell and Andrew Aydin
Recorded on October 4, 2023
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Join March: Book Three’s illustrator Nate Powell and editor Andrew Aydin who share insights and anecdotes about their time spent working on this graphic memoir series with Congressman and civil rights activist John Lewis. This event is part of the Queensborough Community College’s (QCC) Welcome Read, a pedagogical and community-building experience for Fall 2023 first semester Queensborough (QCC) students taking English classes, in both non-credit programs (CLIP and CUNY Start) and credited courses (ALP, ENGL101). The 2023 Welcome Read texts include March: Book One and March: Book Two, written by Civil Rights icon and Congressman John Lewis with Andrew Aydin and illustrated by Nate Powell. 

KHC-NEH Lecture
Weaponizing the Past: German Fascism in the Twentieth Century
Recorded on September 27, 2023
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Join Drs. Aliza Atik and Kathleen Alves, both Associate Professors of English at Queensborough Community College-CUNY and the 2023-24 KHC-National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Faculty Fellows, for a discussion about the aestheticization of German history, and the simultaneous cultural rhetoric of German “greatness” surrounding the anti-Jewish legislation and violence immediately prior to start of World War II. The event will feature selections from the film, Good Morning Mr. Hitler (1993), which captures footage from the 1939 German Art Festival—a mass celebration in Munich, Germany in honor of 2,000 years of German culture that took place six weeks before the war’s outbreak.