Recordings

Making Global Connections


2021-22 Event Recordings

 

Holocaust Memory / Annual Yom HaShoah Commemoration
The Annual Rabbi Isidoro Aizenberg Lecture
Recorded on April 28, 2022
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Join us for a discussion about how institutions and scholars are finding new ways to preserve and document Holocaust memory. The event includes a screening of the new documentary film, Preserving the Holocaust (3Generations), which follows a group of young Polish conservators who are preserving artifacts from the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination and concentration camp. Afterwards, Jane Wells, the film’s director, will be in conversation with Hannah Wilson, PhD candidate at the Department of History, Nottingham Trent University, about how artifacts convey memory. For more information about the film and to watch the trailer, please visit: https://www.3generations.org/film/preserving-the-holocaust/

Virtual Symposium with the Harriman Institute at Columbia University
Resurfacing Memories of the Holocaust in Bulgaria and the former Yugoslavia
Recorded on April 28, 2022

Across Europe, the history of the Holocaust is routinely distorted for nationalist purposes by governments looking to influence interpretations of, while distancing themselves from, the atrocities committed on their soil during World War II. At the same time, evidence continues to emerge about what happened to the Jewish, as well as Roma and Sinti communities throughout Southeast Europe and the Western Balkans. 

Panel 1: Uncovering the Legacy of the Holocaust in Bulgaria
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This panel features a discussion about the documentary film, A Question of Survival: The Complex Legacy of the Holocaust in the Balkans, as well as the challenges of doing research in a country where the history of the Holocaust has been mythologized, obscured, and contested. 

Panel 2: The Fates of the Roma and Sinti during the Holocaust in the former Yugoslavia
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This panel marks the launch of new research commissioned by the Auschwitz Institute for the Prevention of Genocide and Mass Atrocities (AIPG) and the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University.

KHC-NEH Performance
From Slavery to Revolution: Afro-Cuban Folkloric Drumming of Matanzas 
Recorded on April 27, 2022
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The city of Matanzas remains an important hub of Afro-Cuban culture where drumming traditions that arrived with Africans who were forcibly brought to the island in the 19th century are still practiced today. This drumming tradition has survived urban slavery during which Africans were incarcerated in the lowest, flood-prone parts of the bay. It continued to be performed in secret through colonial and pre-revolution history, and only in the last 40 years has this drumming been performed in the open without the persecution of policing and prejudice. Featuring performances by the Queensborough Community College (QCC) Percussion Ensemble under the direction of Dr. Neeraj Mehta, Associate Professor of Music at QCC, this program will contextualize selected works from this repertoire to explore and illustrate the impact that the urban slavery experience and subsequent liberation had on the way this music has been practiced and performed.

Virtual Symposium with the Harriman Institute at Columbia University
The Parallels Between Genocide Denial in the Balkans and Holocaust Distortion
Recorded on April 14, 2022

Genocide denial not only abuses history, including contemporary history, but it also insults the survivors and extends the impact of the original crimes. Denial is the final act that never ends for the survivors. This symposium examines some of the parallels of contemporary genocide denial in the Balkans with increasing Holocaust denial and distortion sweeping across Europe. What can we learn from Holocaust experts and scholars that is applicable to the present? And what are some ways that memory activists resist denial of the most brutal crimes?

Keynote Speaker: Menachem Z. Rosensaft
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Professor Menachem Z. Rosensaft is general counsel and associate executive vice president of the World Jewish Congress, lecturer in law at Columbia Law School, adjunct professor of law at Cornell Law School, and founding chairman of the International Network of Children of Jewish Holocaust Survivors. In addition to his extensive body of publications about and advocacy for Holocaust education and remembrance, including a compelling piece in The Hill (February 2022), Professor Rosensaft has also published opinion editorials on genocide denial in Bosnia and Herzegovina, including in Just Security and Haaretz. He is the author of Poems Born in Bergen-Belsen (Kelsay Books, 2021).

Panel I: Deconstructing the Parallels between Holocaust Distortion and Genocide Denial
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Panel II: Combatting Holocaust Distortion and Genocide Denial through Memory Activism
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Special Event
Art Against War, Art Against Hate: A Conversation with Grzegorz Kwiatkowski
Recorded on Wednesday, April 13, 2022
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Join us for a special conversation with Polish poet/post-rock musician Grzegorz Kwiatkowski who was born into a very particular history. His grandfather was a prisoner in Stutthof, the Nazi concentration camp east of what used to be the Free City of Danzig. Kwiatkowski’s music and poetry explore not only the conflicted past of Eastern Europe but also the paradoxes of contemporary genocides. Kwiatkowski is author of several books of poetry revolving around the subjects of history, remembrance, and ethics. He is a member of a psychedelic rock band Trupa Trupa.

Human Rights and the Museum Series
The Visual Archive: Documenting the Holocaust and Genocide Through Photography
Recorded on April 12, 2022
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Visual archives offer tangible proof of the horrors that have befallen communities who have experienced genocide and mass atrocities. This event explores the importance of using photography to document the existence and destruction of Jewish and Native American communities. First, contemporary fine art photographer Jeremy Dennis will showcase his project, On This Site, which uses photography and an interactive map to highlight culturally significant Native American sites on Long Island. Then, curator, art historian, and art critic Maya Benton will discuss her work in creating both an exhibition and archive of the Russian American photographer Roman Vishniac (1897-1990)’s catalog of 40,000 objects through a partnership between the International Center for Photography and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Partner Event
Making Holocaust Memory Relevant: Inspiring the Next Generation of Community Changemakers
Recorded on April 6, 2022
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Thought Partnerships invites you to commemorate Genocide Awareness month by joining us for an engaging roundtable discussion spotlighting how two different Holocaust Centers are using memorialization and Holocaust education to make the issues of antisemitism, racism, and polarization relevant to the next generation of community changemakers.

Special Event
Gendered Memories: The Legacy of Wartime Sexual Violence in Bosnia and Herzegovina 
Recorded on March 29, 2022
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In a conflict that introduced the concept of rape camps into international consciousness, the 1992-1995 Bosnian War continues to have serious repercussions for the survivors of sexual violence left in its wake. Three decades later, the memorialization of women’s wartime experiences remains a challenge as they continue to fight for justice, financial reparations, psychological support, and community acceptance. Join us for a conversation about the devastating impact that this deliberate war waged on women’s bodies has had at the individual, communal, and national levels. Featuring Sabiha Husić, Director of Association “Medica” Zenica, an NGO working with women and children survivors of war rape and sexual violence; Hasan Hasanović, Head of the Oral History Project at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial; Ann Petrila, Professor of the Practice and Coordinator of Global Initiatives at the University of Denver’s Graduate School of Social Work; and Tanya Domi, Adjunct Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs and an affiliate faculty member of the Harriman Institute.

QCC Common Read Event
Fighting Off the Weight of Nonexistence: A Conversation with Claudia Rankine, author of Citizen: An American Lyric
Recorded on March 23, 2022

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Join us for Queensborough Community College’s (QCC) 2022 Common Read program, a series of cross-disciplinary events in support of a campus-wide, shared reading of a selected text. This year we are thrilled to welcome Claudia Rakine, author of Citizen: An American Lyric, who will discuss how Black people endure racism and microaggressions in various facets of their lives and the institutions they navigate. Ms. Rakine is the author of six collections of poetry, including Just Us: An American Conversation, Citizen: An American Lyric, and Don’t Let Me Be Lonely; three plays including HELP, which premiered in March of 2020 at The Shed, NYC,  The White Card, which premiered in February 2018 (ArtsEmerson/ American Repertory Theater) and was published by Graywolf Press in 2019, and Provenance of Beauty: A South Bronx Travelogue; as well as numerous video collaborations. She is also the co-editor of several anthologies, including The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind (FENCE, 2015). In 2016, she co-founded The Racial Imaginary Institute (TRII). Among her numerous awards and honors, Rankine is the recipient of the Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry, the Poets & Writers’ Jackson Poetry Prize, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, United States Artists, and the National Endowment of the Arts. Rankine teaches at Yale University as the Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry. She lives in New Haven, Connecticut.

KHC-NEH Lecture
Gendered Aspects of LGBTQIA+ Experiences During the Holocaust
Recorded on March 16, 2022
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Join Dr. Danny Sexton, Associate Professor of English at Queensborough Community College, and Dr. Jake Newsome, a public historian of the LGBTQIA+ Past and author of Pink Triangle Legacies: Coming Out in the Shadow of the Holocaust (Cornell University Press, forthcoming) for a conversation about the different gendered experiences of gay men, lesbians, and trans people in the period preceding World War II, the Holocaust, and the years that followed. Dr. Sexton and Dr. Newsome also discuss how gender and sexual orientation influenced the Nazis’ policies, including how each community encountered incarceration and liberation.

Human Rights and the Museum Series
Returning What Was Taken: How Museums Approach Repatriation
Recorded on March 8, 2022
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Western museums are increasingly grappling with a growing number of requests for repatriation—the highly politicized process of returning artwork, cultural items, and human remains to their home countries and communities. Join us for a conversation about how cultural institutions are wrestling with, as well as presenting exhibitions about, these demands. First, Sam Sackeroff, the Lerman-Neubauer Associate Curator at the Jewish Museum discusses the institution’s recent exhibit, Afterlives: Recovering the Lost Stories of Looted Art. Then Erin Thompson, America’s only professor of art crimes at John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York, explores contemporary cases for repatriation, including sacred Nepalese materials, some which remain in Western institutions.

KHC-NEH Lecture
Cultural Landscapes of Confinement: Strengthening Vulnerable Refugee Communities at the Syrian-Turkish Border
Recorded on February 23, 2022
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Composers Sahba Aminikia and Aleksandra Vrebalov speak of their involvement with the Flying Carpet Children’s Festival, an annual arts festival, founded and directed by Aminikia, that takes place each summer along the Syrian-Turkish border. In an environment of intense stress where youth face a magnitude of challenges, Aminikia, Vrebalov, and an international team of volunteer artists work together to bring inclusive, safe, and engaging educational and cultural activities that aid in directing expressions of trauma and in navigating the perils of a transitional state of belonging. The result is an empowering humanistic exchange marked by collective transformations.

Join Dr. Alexandra Lohse for a brief overview of the Nazi concentration camp universe consisting of more than 40,000 sites operated by the Nazi regime and its allies, an almost incomprehensible number that challenges our understanding of the nature, ubiquity, and visibility of Nazi persecution. Using perpetrator documentation as well as survivor and eyewitness testimonies and memoirs, she illuminates the dynamic nature and function of some of these sites while illustrating paths of persecution that many victims suffered there between 1933 and 1945. Dr. Lohse is the Applied Research Scholar Team Lead at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Virtual Holocaust Commemoration
From Awareness to Action: Confronting Antisemitism at Home and Abroad 
Recorded on January 27, 2022
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In commemoration of International Holocaust Remembrance Day, Dr. Robert Williams, Deputy Director for International Affairs at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, discusses how current conspiracy theories and tropes fuel antisemitism domestically and internationally, as well as how and why Holocaust education is one of many ways to combat it. Dr. Williams sits on the steering committee of the Global Task Force on Holocaust Distortion, and served for four years as chair of the Committee on Antisemitism and Holocaust Denial at the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance.

KHC-NEH Performance
Unheard Melodies
Recorded on November 17, 2021
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Renana Gutman, concert pianist and piano faculty at Longy School of Music of Bard College, introduces and performs obscure piano music (including some new discoveries) by great composers whose Jewish identity sealed their fate as musicians and human beings in the period surrounding the two world wars. The imaginative and expressive musical soundscapes of these works, many of which were composed in confinement, follow their composers’ personal and creative transformations while bearing witness to the turbulence and trauma of their time.

Scholars in Conversation Series
Narrating Srebrenica: Conducting Oral Histories with Genocide Survivors
Recorded on November 16, 2021
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In the hills of eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina sits the small town of Srebrenica–once known for silver mines and health spas, now infamous for the genocide that occurred there during the Bosnian War. In July 1995, the Bosnian Serb Army captured and murdered over 8,000 Muslim men and boys, while forcibly bussing the women and girls away from the enclave. Twenty-six years later, many of Srebrenica’s surviving men and women continue to wrestle with coming forward to talk about their harrowing experiences. This conversation focused on the practical, ethical, and gendered challenges involved in conducting oral history interviews with and obtaining consent from genocide survivors. Featuring the authors of Voices from Srebrenica: Survivor Narratives of the Bosnian Genocide (McFarland & Company, 2021), Hasan Hasanović, Head of the Oral History Project at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial and himself a genocide survivor and Ann Petrila, Professor of the Practice and Coordinator of Global Initiatives at the University of Denver’s Graduate School of Social Work, as well as Selma Leydesdorff, Professor of Oral History and Culture at the University of Amsterdam and author of Surviving the Bosnian Genocide: The Women of Srebrenica Speak (Indiana University Press, 2011).

Scholars in Conversation Series
Intersecting Identities: Growing Up Asian and Jewish
Recorded on November 10, 2021
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In their book, JewAsian (University of Nebraska Press, 2016), authors and spouses Dr. Helen Kiyong Kim, Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Professor of Sociology at Whitman College, and Dr. Noah Samuel Leavitt, Director of Student Engagement at Whitman College, examine the intersection of race, religion, and ethnicity in the increasing number of households that are Jewish American and Asian American. Their study explores the larger social dimensions of intermarriages—couples where spouses are of different racial, ethnic, or religious backgrounds— to explain how these unions reflect not only the identity of married individuals but also the communities to which they belong. Drs. Kim and Leavitt, along with Dr. Trevor Milton, Associate Professor of Sociology and Criminology at Queensborough Community College at the City University of New York, discuss the layered multicultural identities of new spouses and their offspring.

Holocaust Memory / Annual Kristallnacht Commemoration
“BOYKOTT April 1, 1933: Spectatorship and the Exclusion of Jews from the German Community”
Recorded on November 10, 2021
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On the anniversary of the Kristallnacht pogrom, Dr. Peter Fritzsche examines the ­first major step toward the persecution and exclusion of German Jews: the boycott of April 1, 1933—Day 62 of the Thousand Year Reich. He also presents a new reconstruction of the timeline of the boycott and the motivations behind it, which swung much of the German population against Jews and behind the regime. Dr. Fritzsche is a professor of history at the University of Illinois, where he has taught since 1987. A recipient of Guggenheim, Humboldt and NEH fellowships, he is the author of several books, including Reading Berlin 1900, Germans into Nazis, and most recently, Hitler’s First Hundred Days.

Scholars in Conversation Series
Intersecting Identities: Navigating Race and Religion
Recorded on November 3, 2021
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This discussion focused on how constructions of identity impact the ways both Jewish and Muslim people are racialized in our society, as well as how beliefs about “the other” contribute to rising antisemitism and Islamophobia. Featuring Dr. Marc Dollinger, Professor and Richard and Rhoda Goldman Chair, Department of Jewish Studies at San Francisco State University and author of Black Power, Jewish Politics: Reinventing the Alliance in the 1960s (Brandeis University Press, 2018) and Dr. Mehnaz Afridi, Director of the Holocaust, Genocide & Interfaith Education Center, Professor of Religious Studies at Manhattan College, and author of Shoah through Muslim Eyes (Academic Studies Press, 2017).

Human Rights & the Museum Series
Planting New Roots: Picturing Jewish and Native Migration Narratives in the Museum
Recorded on October 28, 2021
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Museums and historical centers regularly showcase exhibitions about the migrations of different populations, including how events of the past affect them today. For many Jewish Americans, the Holocaust and the resulting migration out of Europe plays a central role in defining their identities today. The forced migrations and other atrocities committed against Indigenous people of the United States living in what is now called Oklahoma has had a similarly profound impact. The program features Kathryn Lloyd, Senior Director of Programs & Interpretation at the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, and Stacey Halfmoon, Senior Director of The Choctaw Cultural Center, both of whom discuss the power of survival and points of connection between two seemingly different groups of peoples, celebrating the power of survival and points of connection between two seemingly different groups of peoples, as well as the disparate struggles they faced on their paths to carve out communities in contemporary America.

KHC-NEH Lecture
Criminalization and the Other

Recorded on October 27, 2021
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The contemporary criminal justice system has historical connections to the criminalization of people who are culturally deemed the “other.” Join Dr. Celia Sporer, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at Queensborough Community College at the City University of New York, for a discussion about the institutionalization of criminality based on social identity. Dr. Sporer will examine the process and implications of the criminalization of Jewishness in Nazi Germany, as well as reflect upon on the marginalization/exclusion of other groups resulting in their criminalization during different time periods and places.

Holocaust Memory / Book Talk
A Single Photograph Reveals a Crime of the Holocaust
Book Talk with Dr. Wendy Lower, Author of The Ravine: A Family, a Photograph, a Holocaust Massacre Revealed
Recorded on October 6, 2021

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In 2009, Dr. Wendy Lower, John K. Roth Professor of History and Director, Mgrublian Center for Human Rights at Claremont McKenna College and the acclaimed author of Hitler’s Furies, as shown a photograph just brought to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. The documentation of the Holocaust is vast, but there are virtually no images of a Jewish family at the actual moment of murder, in this case by German officials and Ukrainian collaborators. A Ukrainian shooter’s rifle is inches from a woman’s head, obscured in a cloud of smoke. The woman is bending forward, holding the hand of a barefoot boy. And—only one of the shocking revelations of Wendy Lower’s brilliant ten-year investigation of this image—the photograph reveals the shins of another child, slipping from the woman’s lap. Dr. Lower’s gripping detective work—in Ukraine, Germany, Slovakia, Israel, and the United States—recovers astonishing layers of detail concerning the open-air massacres in Ukraine. The identities of the victims, of the killers—and, remarkably, of the photographer who openly took the picture, as a secret act of resistance—are dramatically uncovered. Finally, in the hands of this exceptional scholar, a single image unlocks a new understanding of the place of the family unit in the history and aftermath of Nazi genocide.

Human Rights & the Museum Series
Museums as Places of Trauma and Healing: Processing Visitor Experiences
Recorded on September 30, 2021
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Memorial museums and atrocity site memorials dedicated to educating visitors about human rights violations and genocide can often become spaces that are emotionally triggering. Museum staff are tasked to design exhibits and programs that present these difficult histories while also helping visitors navigate the difficult feelings they may experience. And yet, the teams who work within these spaces on a daily basis can also become traumatized. In this conversation, Dr. Ereshnee Naidu-Silverman, Senior Program Director of the Global Transitional Justice Initiative at the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience, discusses historical trauma and the strategies museum workers use to create spaces of healing for themselves, as well as their visitors.

QCC Welcome Read Event
Illustrating the Civil Rights Movement: A Conversation with Nate Powell
Recorded on September 29, 2021
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Join Nate Powell, illustrator of March: Book One, as he recounts his memories of working with John Lewis while illustrating the Congressman’s graphic memoir about the civil rights movement.

QCC Welcome Read Event
The Genre of Graphic Novel: Student Activism Then and Now
Recorded on September 23, 2021
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Join Queensborough Community College English department faculty members Dr. Robin Ford, Associate Professor of English, and Professor Sybil White for this two-part event about John Lewis’s graphic memoir, March: Book One. Dr. Ford discusses the form and history of the genre of graphic novels while Professor White facilitates a student-led discussion about John Lewis’s and students’ own social justice activism.

KHC-NEH QCC Faculty Workshop
Holocaust Education and Transformational Learning
Recorded on September 22, 2021  
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This workshop explores how Holocaust education can be a catalyst for transformative learning in higher education. Using her research into the behavior of perpetrators and bystanders as a case study, Dr. Azadeh Aalai, Associate Professor of Psychology at Queensborough Community College at the City University of New York, discusses how faculty can design curricula that navigates these difficult histories in an impactful way.

Holocaust Speaker Series
Click here to register and for more information about the series

In this intimate and meaningful experience, speakers present stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The Holocaust Speaker Series is held each Wednesday at 11:00am EST on Zoom.

Select 2020-21 Event Recordings

Holocaust Memory & Commemorations

How Was It Possible?: Introduction to the Holocaust
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Under Siege Again? Holocaust Distortion and the Rise of Hate Crimes Against Jews
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Annual Kristallnacht Commemoration: November 1938 as a Turning Point?
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Nuremberg Laws: How the Nazis Were Influenced by U.S. Jim Crow Laws
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KHC Exhibit Talk: Women in the Nazi Concentration Camps
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KHC Exhibit Talk: LGBTQI+ People in the Nazi Concentration Camps
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2020-21 KHC-NEH Colloquium: Internment and Resistance

Creating a Concentration Camp Society: How Governments Push for Mass Detention and How People Resist
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Graphic Internment
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A Prisoner’s Voice: Poetry of Psychological Resistance
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Understanding the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising through the Theatrical Musical To Paint the Earth
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Italian Internment During World War II and the Limits of Racism in America 
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Oppression and Resistance in America’s World War II Concentration Camps
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Contain and Control: The American Obsession with the Black Body
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Poetry of Psychological Resistance at Auschwitz: The Words of Krystyna Zywulska
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Special Events

Voices from Srebrenica: Survivor Narratives of the Bosnian Genocide
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La Convivencia: Exploring Sephardic Music’s Traditions of Peace and Coexistence
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Intergenerational Trauma, Memory, and Stories Carried Forward
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Peacebuilding Through Awareness & Improvisation, Part 1
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Peacebuilding Through Awareness & Improvisation, Part 2
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Human Rights & the Museum Series

Indigenizing Institutions: A Conversation with Curator and Museum Worker, Taylor Payer 
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Queer Art, Curatorial Collaboration & Social Justice
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Acknowledgement and Survivance: The Impact of the Past and Ongoing Legacy in our Culture Now
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