Events

Making Global Connections

We host a range of programs about Holocaust memory and its ongoing impact across, as well as relevancy to, societies around the world through annual commemorations, special events, our NEH colloquia series, and lectures about our originally researched exhibitions. Click here for links to our recently recorded events. You can also explore our curated YouTube playlists by clicking here.


Spring 2022 Virtual Events


All events are free and open to the public but registration is required.
They are also being recorded so be sure to check back for the viewing links.

Virtual Holocaust Commemoration
From Awareness to Action: Confronting Antisemitism at Home and Abroad 
Thursday, January 27, 2022, at 6pm EST
Click here to register: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_fJz7rDZBSJqZez8IZQLiHw

In commemoration of International Holocaust Remembrance Day, join Dr. Robert Williams, Deputy Director for International Affairs at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, for a discussion about how current conspiracy theories and tropes fuel antisemitism domestically and internationally, as well as how and why Holocaust education is one of many ways to combat it. Dr. Williams sits on the steering committee of the Global Task Force on Holocaust Distortion, and served for four years as chair of the Committee on Antisemitism and Holocaust Denial at the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance.

This event is organized by the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center at Queensborough Community College and is co-sponsored by the Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College; the Holocaust & Human Rights Education Center in White Plains; the Holocaust Museum & Center for Tolerance & Education at Rockland Community College; the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County; the Wagner College Holocaust Center; the Gross Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies at Ramapo College of New Jersey; the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights at Rutgers University; the Emil A. and Jenny Fish Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Yeshiva University; and the Center for Social Justice and Human Understanding at Suffolk County Community College.

KHC-NEH Lecture
The Nazi Camp Universe, 1933-1945: Landscapes of Suffering and Paths of Persecution
Wednesday, February 9, 2022, at 12pm EST
Click here to register: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_4qxinfSaRxKeYeUK4bTJww

Join Dr. Alexandra Lohse for a brief overview of the Nazi concentration camp universe consisting of more than 40,000 sites operated by the Nazi regime and its allies, an almost incomprehensible number that challenges our understanding of the nature, ubiquity, and visibility of Nazi persecution. Using perpetrator documentation as well as survivor and eyewitness testimonies and memoirs, her talk will illuminate the dynamic nature and function of some of these sites while illustrating paths of persecution that many victims suffered there between 1933 and 1945. Dr. Lohse is the Applied Research Scholar Team Lead at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

This event is part of the 2021-22 KHC and National Endowment for the Humanities Colloquium, “Incarceration, Transformation & Paths to Liberation during the Holocaust and Beyond.”

KHC-NEH Lecture
Cultural Landscapes of Confinement: Strengthening Vulnerable Refugee Communities at the Syrian-Turkish Border
Wednesday, February 23, 2022, at 12pm EST
Click here to register: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_dh8NjxB6QD2F-vTEVdckLQ

Composers Sahba Aminikia and Aleksandra Vrebalov speak of their involvement with the Flying Carpet Children’s Festival, an annual arts festival, founded and directed by Aminikia, that takes place each summer along the Syrian-Turkish border. In an environment of intense stress where youth face a magnitude of challenges, Aminikia, Vrebalov, and an international team of volunteer artists work together to bring inclusive, safe, and engaging educational and cultural activities that aid in directing expressions of trauma and in navigating the perils of a transitional state of belonging. The result is an empowering humanistic exchange marked by collective transformations.

This event is co-sponsored by the Harriet and Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and Queensborough Performing Arts Center (QPAC) at Queensborough Community College. It is also part of the 2021-22 KHC and National Endowment for the Humanities Colloquium, “Incarceration, Transformation & Paths to Liberation during the Holocaust and Beyond.”

Human Rights and the Museum Series
Returning What Was Taken: How Museums Approach Repatriation
Tuesday, March 8, 2022, at 2pm EST
Click here to register: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_McCyw24mRrGtHenx6oaqSA

Western museums are increasingly grappling with a growing number of requests for repatriation—the highly politicized process of returning artwork, cultural items, and human remains to their home countries and communities. Join us for a conversation about how cultural institutions are wrestling with, as well as presenting exhibitions about, these demands. First, Sam Sackeroff, the Lerman-Neubauer Associate Curator at the Jewish Museum will discuss the institution’s recent exhibit, Afterlives: Recovering the Lost Stories of Looted Art. Then Erin Thompson, America’s only professor of art crimes at John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York, explores contemporary cases for repatriation, including sacred Nepalese materials, some which remain in Western institutions.

This event is a collaboration between the Harriet and Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and the Museum and Gallery Studies Program in the Art and Design Department at Queensborough Community College (QCC) at the City University of New York.

KHC-NEH Lecture
Gendered Aspects of LGBTQIA+ Experiences During the Holocaust
Wednesday, March 16, 2022, at 12pm EDT
Click here to register: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Q0OoqMdGQJ6ddBxu6g7Nfw

Join Dr. Danny Sexton, Associate Professor of English at Queensborough Community College, and Dr. Jake Newsome, a public historian of the LGBTQIA+ Past and author of Pink Triangle Legacies: Coming Out in the Shadow of the Holocaust (Cornell University Press, forthcoming) for a conversation about the different gendered experiences of gay men, lesbians, and trans people in the period preceding the World War II, the Holocaust, and the years that followed. Dr. Sexton and Dr. Newsome will also discuss how gender and sexual orientation influenced the Nazis’ policies, including how each community encountered incarceration and liberation.

This event is part of the 2021-22 KHC and National Endowment for the Humanities Colloquium, “Incarceration, Transformation & Paths to Liberation during the Holocaust and Beyond.”

QCC Common Read Event
Fighting Off the Weight of Nonexistence: A Conversation with Claudia Rankine, author of Citizen: An American Lyric
Wednesday, March 23, 2022, at 12pm EDT
Click here to register: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_mOwR5MriTEGm4pTMapgFBg

Join us for Queensborough Community College’s (QCC) 2022 Common Read program, a series of cross-disciplinary events in support of a campus-wide, shared reading of a selected text. This year we are thrilled to welcome Claudia Rakine, author of Citizen: An American Lyric, who will discuss how race and microaggressions manifest in various facets of our lives and the institutions we navigate. Ms. Rakine is the author of six collections of poetry, including Just Us: An American Conversation, Citizen: An American Lyric, and Don’t Let Me Be Lonely; three plays including HELP, which premiered in March of 2020 at The Shed, NYC,  The White Card, which premiered in February 2018 (ArtsEmerson/ American Repertory Theater) and was published by Graywolf Press in 2019, and Provenance of Beauty: A South Bronx Travelogue; as well as numerous video collaborations. She is also the co-editor of several anthologies, including The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind (FENCE, 2015). In 2016, she co-founded The Racial Imaginary Institute (TRII). Among her numerous awards and honors, Rankine is the recipient of the Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry, the Poets & Writers’ Jackson Poetry Prize, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, United States Artists, and the National Endowment of the Arts. Rankine teaches at Yale University as the Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry. She lives in New Haven, Connecticut.

Human Rights and the Museum Series
The Visual Archive: Documenting the Holocaust and Genocide Through Photography
Tuesday, April 12, 2022, at 4pm EDT
Click here to register: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Hu3Vpc87Tpe74UDkEXO7Qw

Visual archives offer tangible proof of the horrors that have befallen communities who have experienced genocide and mass atrocities. This event will explore the importance of using photography to document the existence and destruction of Jewish and Native American communities. First, contemporary fine art photographer Jeremy Dennis will showcase his project, On This Site, which uses photography and an interactive map to highlight culturally significant Native American sites on Long Island, a topic of special meaning for the artist who is a tribal member of the Shinnecock Nation of Southampton, NY. Then, curator, art historian, and art critic Maya Benton will discuss her work in creating both an exhibition and archive of the Russian American photographer Roman Vishniac’s (1897-1990) catalog of 40,000 objects through a joint partnership between the International Center for Photography and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Vishniac created the most widely recognized and reproduced photographic record of Jewish life in Eastern Europe between the two world wars.

This event is a collaboration between the Harriet and Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and the Museum and Gallery Studies Program in the Art and Design Department at Queensborough Community College (QCC) at the City University of New York.

KHC-NEH Performance
From Slavery to Revolution: Afro-Cuban Folkloric Drumming of Matanzas 
Wednesday, April 27, 2022, at 12pm EDT
Click here to register: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_6R127Ry4SWigh32B6WoySQ

The city of Matanzas remains an important hub of Afro-Cuban culture where drumming traditions that arrived with Africans who were forcibly brought to the island in the 19th century are still practiced today. This drumming tradition has survived urban slavery during which Africans were incarcerated in the lowest, flood-prone parts of the bay. It continued to be performed in secret through colonial and pre-revolution history, and only in the last 40 years has this drumming been performed in the open without the persecution of policing and prejudice. Featuring performances by the Queensborough Community College (QCC) Percussion Ensemble under the direction of Dr. Neeraj Mehta, Associate Professor of Music at QCC, this program will contextualize selected works from this repertoire to explore and illustrate the impact that the urban slavery experience and subsequent liberation had on the way this music has been practiced and performed.

This event is co-sponsored by the Harriet and Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and Queensborough Performing Arts Center (QPAC) at Queensborough Community College. It is also part of the 2021-22 KHC and National Endowment for the Humanities Colloquium, “Incarceration, Transformation & Paths to Liberation during the Holocaust and Beyond.”

Partner Event
The Holocaust in Bulgaria
Thursday, April 28, 2022
More details to follow

Holocaust Memory / Annual Yom HaShoah Commemoration
The Annual Rabbi Isidoro Aizenberg Lecture
Thursday, April 28, 2022, at 6pm EDT
Click here to register: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_A9XR4qZITmeXvduaoVdHsw

Join the KHC for our annual Yom HaShoah Commemoration which discusses new ways that Holocaust memory is being documented.

Holocaust Speaker Series
This ongoing series features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The series is organized by the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center, sponsored by Margaret and Michael Valentine, and presented in partnership with the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage.

Click here to register: https://www.holocaustandhumanity.org/speaker-series/