Category: ADA Compliant

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  • Image of children’s barrack in Auschwitz II-Birkenau at the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum, 2017

    The Concentration Camps:

    This original exhibition at the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center surveys the scope and brutality of the Nazi system of incarceration and genocide, underscoring the horrific consequences of intolerance, racism, and authoritarianism. Approximately 44,000 concentration camps and ghettos existed across Nazi-occupied Europe and North Africa during World War II. These incarceration sites, which Adolf Hitler used as a mechanism…

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  • Cover Image of the KHC's 'Conspiracy of Goodness' exhibition catalog

    Conspiracy Of Goodness

    This exhibition tells the story of how an isolated Huguenot community in the Haute-Loire region, saved 3,500 Jews from Nazi Germany and the soldiers of Vichy France. Villagers of Le Chambon-sur-Lignon and the surrounding villages, joined together to conceal, rescue, and provide false documentation for Jews and French Resistance fighters, at great risk to their own lives. Click below to…

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  • Image of Mirror Shield conceived by Cannupa Hanska Luger and Rob Wilson Photography

    Survivance & Sovereignty on Turtle Island

    The exhibition addresses the histories and present-day realities of the first people of this continent through contemporary Native American art. Turtle Island is the name given to North America by the Anishinabek, the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), and the Lenape—some of the Indigenous people of this region. The artists address survivance: a term that emphasizes both cultural survival and resistance in the…

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  • Image of a concentration camp uniform with prisoner number featured in the KHC's exhibition, 'The Jacket from Dachau'

    The Jacket from Dachau

    In July of 2015, the KHC was contacted by a vintage clothing dealer about a recent acquisition of a unique garment at an estate sale. In the back of a walk-in closet, amid a variety of old shirts and vintage dresses, hung a faded striped jacket. We now know Benzion Peresecki, a young Jewish man from Lithuania, wore this jacket…

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  • Cover image of the KHC's

    Producing Silence: Hollywood, the Holocaust, and the Jews

    This original illustrated exhibition discusses the impact of the Holocaust, the Nazi party and antisemitism, and their effect on the production and censorship of the American film industry. This exhibit is an attempt to capture and explore some of the tensions that Hollywood faced during the 1930-1942 years.

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    In the Land of the Shahs: Jewish Lives in Persia/Iran

    This exhibit documents the rich history of the Jews of Persia/Iran. It focuses extensively on World War II, the golden period under the last Shah, the Islamic revolution, and recent struggles of Jews with antisemitism and Holocaust denial. Produced with the involvement of the local Iranian/Persian community and scholars, it contains over 43 historic, archival, and modern day images that help to…

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  • Cover image of the KHC's exhibition catalog for

    The Train From Auschwitz: Journey From Shame to Self-Realization

    Artist David Gev’s mixed-media sculpture and video installation interprets his father’s journey in a livestock train cart to Auschwitz. His accounts of starvation, coldness, fear, exhaustion, and death are the genesis of Gev’s art. He imagines a colored landscape with ever-changing horizon lines seen through a slit in the wooden panels.

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    Their Brother’s Keepers: American Liberators of Nazi Death Camps

    Buchenwald, Nordhausen, Bergen-Belsen, Dachau – these are only some of the camps the American army liberated. The bulk of the army consisted of 19 to 25 year-old men who had already experienced the ravages of war. But these young soldiers had neither heard of the concentration camps nor the horrors that were being committed inside their gates. Their memories would be forever marked…

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    Lost Voices: Greek Jews and the Holocaust

    The German Nazi forces entered Salonika in April 1941. Following two years of punishing measures directed at the 56,000 Jews in the city, such as the wearing of the Yellow Star and the robbing of all their belongings, the Jewish population was finally restricted to specific areas. On March 15, 1943, the first deportation took place. This exhibit focuses on how…

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  • Cover image of the KHC's

    Music In Hell

    Rough visual and audio representations, this exhibit examines the wide scope of the musical activities that existed before, during, and after the Holocaust: choirs, orchestras, and chamber groups that operated for months, and sometimes years, in the midst of the inferno. Whether a symbol of defiance, resistance or hope, music plays a transformative role in the lives of those who…

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    Genocide Among the Flowers: Seymour Kaftan’s Ponary Paintings

    This exhibit tells the story of Vilnius’ Jews starting with the Nazi invasion, and including the Ponary tragedy. It does so through the visual images recorded by Seymour Kaftan—born Szepsel Kaftanjski—in 26 oil paintings. A Holocaust survivor—he was 15 years old when the Nazis invaded his hometown—Kaftan documented his personal ordeal, depicting the horrors of Nazi brutality, the loss of…

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    Goose Stepping on Long Island: Camp Siegfried

    In the mid-1930s an organization called the German-American Bund established fifteen summer camps throughout the United States, including one in then-bucolic Yaphank on Long Island. This exhibit exposes the work and the propaganda activities of the Bund at the time when the threat of Nazism seemed foreign to the U.S., certainly to the hinterland of Long Island. It also underlines…

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