Events

Making Global Connections

We host a range of programs about Holocaust memory and its ongoing impact across, as well as relevancy to, societies around the world through annual commemorations, special events, our NEH colloquia series, and lectures about our originally researched exhibitions. Click here for links to our recently recorded events. You can also explore our curated YouTube playlists by clicking here.


Fall 2021 Virtual Events

All events are free but advance registration is required.

Special Event
Leadership Lessons from the Rwandan Genocide: A Conversation with Lieutenant-General (ret) Roméo Dallaire
Wednesday, October 20, 2021 from 7:55pm to 9:05pm EDT
No registration required: use the link below on the day of the event
Click here to join this event on Microsoft Teams

Lieutenant-General (ret) Roméo Dallaire is founder of the Dallaire Institute for Children, Peace, and Security, the global partnership with the mission to end and prevent the recruitment and use of children in violence. A celebrated advocate for human rights with a special focus on child soldiers, veterans, and the prevention of mass atrocities, General Dallaire is also a respected government and United Nations (UN) advisor and former Canadian Senator. He was appointed Force Commander of the UN Assistance Mission for Rwanda prior to and during the 1994 genocide. General Dallaire provided the UN with information about the planned massacre, which ultimately took more than 800,000 lives in less than 100 days; yet, permission to intervene was denied and the UN withdrew its peacekeeping forces. General Dallaire, along with a small contingent of Ghanaian and Tunisian soldiers and military observers, disobeyed the command to withdraw and remained in Rwanda to fulfill their ethical obligation to protect those who sought refuge with the UN forces.

This event is hosted by the Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies at the US Military Academy at West Point and co-sponsored by the Harriet and Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center at Queensborough Community College; the Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College; the Genocide Studies Program at Yale University; and the Human Rights Project at Bard College.

Holocaust Speaker Series
Joel Nahari
Wednesday, October 27, 2021 at 11:00am EDT
Click here to register

Joel’s parents both escaped the Holocaust as children. His mother, Ruth Dresel, was born in Germany in 1926, and experienced antisemitism before escaping to Israel with her family at age 9. Eight members of her family were murdered in the Holocaust, and the few known survivors escaped to Israel, China, England, Chile, and the United States. Joel’s father, Uri Nahari, was born in Czechoslovakia in 1924, and he too witnessed and experienced the brutality of the Nazis before escaping alone to Palestine in 1939 at age 14. The Nazis murdered his entire immediate family with the exception of his sister, an aunt and 2 cousins. Both of Joel’s parents joined the Jewish underground army who were fighting the British and the Arab nations, and helped Israel gain independence in 1948. Joel and his family immigrated to the United States in 1967 and settled in upstate New York. This ongoing series features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The series is organized by the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center, sponsored by Margaret and Michael Valentine, and presented in partnership with the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage.

KHC-NEH Lecture
Criminalization and the Other

Wednesday, October 27, 2021 at 12:00pm EDT
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The contemporary criminal justice system has historical connections to the criminalization of people who are culturally deemed the “other.” Join Dr. Celia Sporer, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at Queensborough Community College at the City University of New York, for a discussion about the institutionalization of criminality based on social identity. Dr. Sporer will examine the process and implications of the criminalization of Jewishness in Nazi Germany, as well as reflect upon on the marginalization/exclusion of other groups resulting in their criminalization during different time periods and places. This event is part of the 2021-22 Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and National Endowment for the Humanities Colloquium entitled, “Incarceration, Transformation & Paths to Liberation during the Holocaust and Beyond.”

Human Rights & the Museum Series
Planting New Roots: Picturing Jewish and Native Migration Narratives in the Museum
Thursday, October 28, 2021 at 4:00pm EDT
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Museums and historical centers regularly showcase exhibitions about the migrations of different populations, including how events of the past affect them today. For many Jewish Americans, the Holocaust and the resulting migration out of Europe plays a central role in defining their identities today. The forced migrations and other atrocities committed against Indigenous people of the United States living in what is now called Oklahoma has had a similarly profound impact. Join Kathryn Lloyd, Senior Director of Programs & Interpretation at the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, and Stacey Halfmoon, Senior Director of The Choctaw Cultural Center, for a conversation celebrating the power of survival and points of connection between two seemingly different groups of peoples, as well as the disparate struggles they faced on their paths to carve out communities in contemporary America.

The program also marks the launch of the KHC and QCC’s brand new Library Guide on Native American and Indigenous Survivance authored by Zak Risinger, 2021 KHC Fellow and graduate of the CUNY School of Professional Studies Museum Studies MA Program. This event is co-sponsored by the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center, Queensborough Community College’s Gallery and Museum Studies Program, and the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights at Rutgers University.

Holocaust Speaker Series
Tom M. Schaumberg
Wednesday, November 3, 2021 at 11:00am EDT
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Tom Schaumber’s father came from Kirchheim, Germany. Pollo, Tom’s mother, met her future husband after she immigrated to Holland in 1933. The couple lived in Amsterdam. In 1943, mother, father, and son Tom were deported to Westerbork. From there they were sent to Bergen-Belsen. The Schaumberg’s were being transported to Auschwitz when they were liberated by the Russians. The family returned to Amsterdam briefly before emigrating to the United States. This ongoing series features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The series is organized by the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center, sponsored by Margaret and Michael Valentine, and presented in partnership with the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage.

Scholars in Conversation Series
Intersecting Identities: Navigating Race and Religion
Wednesday, November 3, 2021 at 6:00pm EDT
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Join us for a discussion about how constructions of identity impact the ways both Jewish and Muslim people are racialized in our society, as well as how beliefs about “the other” contribute to rising antisemitism and Islamophobia. Featuring Dr. Marc Dollinger, Professor and Richard and Rhoda Goldman Chair, Department of Jewish Studies at San Francisco State University and author of Black Power, Jewish Politics: Reinventing the Alliance in the 1960s (Brandeis University Press, 2018) and Dr. Mehnaz Afridi, Director of the Holocaust, Genocide & Interfaith Education Center, Professor of Religious Studies at Manhattan College, and author of Shoah through Muslim Eyes (Academic Studies Press, 2017). This is event is co-sponsored by the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center and the Center for the Study of Genocide & Human Rights at Rutgers University.

Holocaust Speaker Series
Dr. Al Miller
Wednesday, November 10, 2021 at 11:00am EST
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Dr. Al Miller was born in Berlin, Germany in 1922, where his family owned a successful shirt factory. As conditions became worse for the Jews of Germany, his family put together a plan to leave the country and resettle elsewhere. Al departed Nazi Germany in 1937 for Switzerland, while his brother was sent to England. His parents were forced to remain in Berlin because their exit papers had been confiscated by the Gestapo (secret police). They witnessed Kristallnacht and were hidden in a friend’s home. The family was eventually to reunite in England before immigrating to America in 1939. Al served in the US Army from 1943-1946. Because of his ability to speak German, he was trained in intelligence at Fort Ritchie in Maryland and then sent back to Germany to interrogate suspected war criminals after the war’s end in 1945. This ongoing series features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The series is organized by the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center, sponsored by Margaret and Michael Valentine, and presented in partnership with the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage.

Scholars in Conversation Series
Intersecting Identities: Growing Up Asian and Jewish
Wednesday, November 10, 2021 at 12:00pm EST
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In their book, JewAsian (University of Nebraska Press, 2016), authors and spouses Dr. Helen Kiyong Kim, Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Professor of Sociology at Whitman College, and Dr. Noah Samuel Leavitt, Director of Student Engagement at Whitman College, examine the intersection of race, religion, and ethnicity in the increasing number of households that are Jewish American and Asian American. Their study explores the larger social dimensions of intermarriages—couples where spouses are of different racial, ethnic, or religious backgrounds— to explain how these unions reflect not only the identity of married individuals but also the communities to which they belong. Join Drs. Kim and Leavitt, along with Dr. Trevor Milton, Associate Professor of Sociology and Criminology at Queensborough Community College at the City University of New York, for a discussion about the layered multicultural identities of new spouses and their offspring. This event is co-sponsored by the Jewish Studies Department at Queens College and the Center for the Study of Genocide & Human Rights at Rutgers University.

Holocaust Memory / Annual Kristallnacht Commemoration
“BOYKOTT April 1, 1933: Spectatorship and the Exclusion of Jews from the German Community”
Wednesday, November 10, 2021 at 7:00pm EST
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On the anniversary of the Kristallnacht pogrom, Dr. Peter Fritzsche will examine the ­first major step toward the persecution and exclusion of German Jews: the boycott of April 1, 1933—Day 62 of the Thousand Year Reich. He will present a new reconstruction of the timeline of the boycott and the motivations behind it, which swung much of the German population against Jews and behind the regime. Dr. Fritzsche is a professor of history at the University of Illinois, where he has taught since 1987. A recipient of Guggenheim, Humboldt and NEH fellowships, he is the author of several books, including Reading Berlin 1900, Germans into Nazis, and most recently, Hitler’s First Hundred Days. This event is co-sponsored by the Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College and the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center at Queensborough Community College.

Scholars in Conversation Series
Narrating Srebrenica: Conducting Oral Histories with Genocide Survivors
Tuesday, November 16, 2021 at 12:00pm EST
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In the hills of eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina sits the small town of Srebrenica–once known for silver mines and health spas, now infamous for the genocide that occurred there during the Bosnian War. In July 1995, the Bosnian Serb Army captured and murdered over 8,000 Muslim men and boys, while forcibly bussing the women and girls away from the enclave. Twenty-six years later, many of Srebrenica’s surviving men and women continue to wrestle with coming forward to talk about their harrowing experiences. Join us for a conversation about the practical, ethical, and gendered challenges involved in conducting oral history interviews with and obtaining consent from genocide survivors. Featuring the authors of Voices from Srebrenica: Survivor Narratives of the Bosnian Genocide (McFarland & Company, 2021), Hasan Hasanović, Head of the Oral History Project at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial and himself a genocide survivor and Ann Petrila, Professor of the Practice and Coordinator of Global Initiatives at the University of Denver’s Graduate School of Social Work, as well as Selma Leydesdorff, Professor of Oral History and Culture at the University of Amsterdam and author of Surviving the Bosnian Genocide: The Women of Srebrenica Speak (Indiana University Press, 2011). This event is co-sponsored by the Harriman Institute at Columbia University; the Sam and Frances Fried Holocaust and Genocide Academy at the University of Nebraska at Omaha; the Center for the Study of Genocide & Human Rights at Rutgers University; the Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College; and the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center.

KHC-NEH Performance
Unheard Melodies
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 at 12:00pm EST
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Renana Gutman, concert pianist and piano faculty at Longy School of Music of Bard College, introduces and performs obscure piano music (including some new discoveries) by great composers whose Jewish identity sealed their fate as musicians and human beings in the period surrounding the two world wars. The imaginative and expressive musical soundscapes of these works, many of which were composed in confinement, follow their composers’ personal and creative transformations while bearing witness to the turbulence and trauma of their time. This event is part of the 2021-22 Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and National Endowment for the Humanities Colloquium entitled, “Incarceration, Transformation & Paths to Liberation during the Holocaust and Beyond” and is co-sponsored by the Longy School of Music of Bard College.