Recordings

Making Global Connections

Scroll below for links to all of our recorded programs by semester and by theme. You can also explore our curated YouTube playlists by clicking here.


2021-22 Event Recordings

KHC-NEH Performance
Unheard Melodies
Recorded on November 17, 2021
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Renana Gutman, concert pianist and piano faculty at Longy School of Music of Bard College, introduces and performs obscure piano music (including some new discoveries) by great composers whose Jewish identity sealed their fate as musicians and human beings in the period surrounding the two world wars. The imaginative and expressive musical soundscapes of these works, many of which were composed in confinement, follow their composers’ personal and creative transformations while bearing witness to the turbulence and trauma of their time. This event is part of the 2021-22 Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and National Endowment for the Humanities Colloquium entitled, “Incarceration, Transformation & Paths to Liberation during the Holocaust and Beyond” and is co-sponsored by the Longy School of Music of Bard College and the Department of Music at Queensborough Community College.

Scholars in Conversation Series
Narrating Srebrenica: Conducting Oral Histories with Genocide Survivors
Recorded on November 16, 2021
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In the hills of eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina sits the small town of Srebrenica–once known for silver mines and health spas, now infamous for the genocide that occurred there during the Bosnian War. In July 1995, the Bosnian Serb Army captured and murdered over 8,000 Muslim men and boys, while forcibly bussing the women and girls away from the enclave. Twenty-six years later, many of Srebrenica’s surviving men and women continue to wrestle with coming forward to talk about their harrowing experiences. This conversation focused on the practical, ethical, and gendered challenges involved in conducting oral history interviews with and obtaining consent from genocide survivors. Featuring the authors of Voices from Srebrenica: Survivor Narratives of the Bosnian Genocide (McFarland & Company, 2021), Hasan Hasanović, Head of the Oral History Project at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial and himself a genocide survivor and Ann Petrila, Professor of the Practice and Coordinator of Global Initiatives at the University of Denver’s Graduate School of Social Work, as well as Selma Leydesdorff, Professor of Oral History and Culture at the University of Amsterdam and author of Surviving the Bosnian Genocide: The Women of Srebrenica Speak (Indiana University Press, 2011). This event was co-sponsored by the Harriman Institute at Columbia University; the Sam and Frances Fried Holocaust and Genocide Academy at the University of Nebraska at Omaha; the Center for the Study of Genocide & Human Rights at Rutgers University; the Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College; and the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center.

Scholars in Conversation Series
Intersecting Identities: Growing Up Asian and Jewish
Recorded on November 10, 2021
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In their book, JewAsian (University of Nebraska Press, 2016), authors and spouses Dr. Helen Kiyong Kim, Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Professor of Sociology at Whitman College, and Dr. Noah Samuel Leavitt, Director of Student Engagement at Whitman College, examine the intersection of race, religion, and ethnicity in the increasing number of households that are Jewish American and Asian American. Their study explores the larger social dimensions of intermarriages—couples where spouses are of different racial, ethnic, or religious backgrounds— to explain how these unions reflect not only the identity of married individuals but also the communities to which they belong. Drs. Kim and Leavitt, along with Dr. Trevor Milton, Associate Professor of Sociology and Criminology at Queensborough Community College at the City University of New York, discuss the layered multicultural identities of new spouses and their offspring. This event was co-sponsored by the Jewish Studies Department at Queens College and the Center for the Study of Genocide & Human Rights at Rutgers University.

Holocaust Memory / Annual Kristallnacht Commemoration
“BOYKOTT April 1, 1933: Spectatorship and the Exclusion of Jews from the German Community”
Recorded on November 10, 2021
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On the anniversary of the Kristallnacht pogrom, Dr. Peter Fritzsche examines the ­first major step toward the persecution and exclusion of German Jews: the boycott of April 1, 1933—Day 62 of the Thousand Year Reich. He also presents a new reconstruction of the timeline of the boycott and the motivations behind it, which swung much of the German population against Jews and behind the regime. Dr. Fritzsche is a professor of history at the University of Illinois, where he has taught since 1987. A recipient of Guggenheim, Humboldt and NEH fellowships, he is the author of several books, including Reading Berlin 1900, Germans into Nazis, and most recently, Hitler’s First Hundred Days. This event was co-sponsored by the Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College and the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center at Queensborough Community College.

Scholars in Conversation Series
Intersecting Identities: Navigating Race and Religion
Recorded on November 3, 2021
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This discussion focused on how constructions of identity impact the ways both Jewish and Muslim people are racialized in our society, as well as how beliefs about “the other” contribute to rising antisemitism and Islamophobia. Featuring Dr. Marc Dollinger, Professor and Richard and Rhoda Goldman Chair, Department of Jewish Studies at San Francisco State University and author of Black Power, Jewish Politics: Reinventing the Alliance in the 1960s (Brandeis University Press, 2018) and Dr. Mehnaz Afridi, Director of the Holocaust, Genocide & Interfaith Education Center, Professor of Religious Studies at Manhattan College, and author of Shoah through Muslim Eyes (Academic Studies Press, 2017). This is event was co-sponsored by the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center and the Center for the Study of Genocide & Human Rights at Rutgers University.

Human Rights & the Museum Series
Planting New Roots: Picturing Jewish and Native Migration Narratives in the Museum
Recorded on October 28, 2021
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Museums and historical centers regularly showcase exhibitions about the migrations of different populations, including how events of the past affect them today. For many Jewish Americans, the Holocaust and the resulting migration out of Europe plays a central role in defining their identities today. The forced migrations and other atrocities committed against Indigenous people of the United States living in what is now called Oklahoma has had a similarly profound impact. The program features Kathryn Lloyd, Senior Director of Programs & Interpretation at the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, and Stacey Halfmoon, Senior Director of The Choctaw Cultural Center, both of whom discuss the power of survival and points of connection between two seemingly different groups of peoples, celebrating the power of survival and points of connection between two seemingly different groups of peoples, as well as the disparate struggles they faced on their paths to carve out communities in contemporary America. This event is co-sponsored by the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center, Queensborough Community College’s Gallery and Museum Studies Program, and the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights at Rutgers University.

KHC-NEH Lecture
Criminalization and the Other

Recorded on October 27, 2021
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The contemporary criminal justice system has historical connections to the criminalization of people who are culturally deemed the “other.” Join Dr. Celia Sporer, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at Queensborough Community College at the City University of New York, for a discussion about the institutionalization of criminality based on social identity. Dr. Sporer will examine the process and implications of the criminalization of Jewishness in Nazi Germany, as well as reflect upon on the marginalization/exclusion of other groups resulting in their criminalization during different time periods and places. This event is part of the 2021-22 Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and National Endowment for the Humanities Colloquium entitled, “Incarceration, Transformation & Paths to Liberation during the Holocaust and Beyond.”

Holocaust Memory / Book Talk
A Single Photograph Reveals a Crime of the Holocaust
Book Talk with Dr. Wendy Lower, Author of The Ravine: A Family, a Photograph, a Holocaust Massacre Revealed
Recorded on October 6, 2021

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In 2009, Dr. Wendy Lower, John K. Roth Professor of History and Director, Mgrublian Center for Human Rights at Claremont McKenna College and the acclaimed author of Hitler’s Furies, as shown a photograph just brought to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. The documentation of the Holocaust is vast, but there are virtually no images of a Jewish family at the actual moment of murder, in this case by German officials and Ukrainian collaborators. A Ukrainian shooter’s rifle is inches from a woman’s head, obscured in a cloud of smoke. The woman is bending forward, holding the hand of a barefoot boy. And—only one of the shocking revelations of Wendy Lower’s brilliant ten-year investigation of this image—the photograph reveals the shins of another child, slipping from the woman’s lap. Dr. Lower’s gripping detective work—in Ukraine, Germany, Slovakia, Israel, and the United States—recovers astonishing layers of detail concerning the open-air massacres in Ukraine. The identities of the victims, of the killers—and, remarkably, of the photographer who openly took the picture, as a secret act of resistance—are dramatically uncovered. Finally, in the hands of this exceptional scholar, a single image unlocks a new understanding of the place of the family unit in the history and aftermath of Nazi genocide. This event is hosted by the Gross Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies at Ramapo College and is co-sponsored by the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at the US Military Academy at West Point, and the Gross Family Center for the Study of Antisemitism and the Holocaust.

Human Rights & the Museum Series
Museums as Places of Trauma and Healing: Processing Visitor Experiences
Recorded on September 30, 2021
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Memorial museums and atrocity site memorials dedicated to educating visitors about human rights violations and genocide can often become spaces that are emotionally triggering. Museum staff are tasked to design exhibits and programs that present these difficult histories while also helping visitors navigate the difficult feelings they may experience. And yet, the teams who work within these spaces on a daily basis can also become traumatized. In this conversation, Dr. Ereshnee Naidu-Silverman, Senior Program Director of the Global Transitional Justice Initiative at the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience, discusses historical trauma and the strategies museum workers use to create spaces of healing for themselves, as well as their visitors. This event is co-sponsored by the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center, Queensborough Community College’s Gallery and Museum Studies Program, and the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust and Humanity Center.

QCC Welcome Read Event
Illustrating the Civil Rights Movement: A Conversation with Nate Powell
Recorded on September 29, 2021
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Join Nate Powell, illustrator of March: Book One, as he recounts his memories of working with John Lewis while illustrating the Congressman’s graphic memoir about the civil rights movement. This event is a collaboration between the Kupferberg Holocaust Center and QCC’s English Department, Pre-College Programs and the Center for Tutoring and Academic Support.

QCC Welcome Read Event
The Genre of Graphic Novel: Student Activism Then and Now
Recorded on September 23, 2021
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Join Queensborough Community College English department faculty members Dr. Robin Ford, Associate Professor of English, and Professor Sybil White for this two-part event about John Lewis’s graphic memoir, March: Book One. Dr. Ford discusses the form and history of the genre of graphic novels while Professor White facilitates a student-led discussion about John Lewis’s and students’ own social justice activism. This event is a collaboration between the Kupferberg Holocaust Center and QCC’s English Department, Pre-College Programs and the Center for Tutoring and Academic Support.

KHC-NEH QCC Faculty Workshop
Holocaust Education and Transformational Learning
Recorded on September 22, 2021  
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This workshop explores how Holocaust education can be a catalyst for transformative learning in higher education. Using her research into the behavior of perpetrators and bystanders as a case study, Dr. Azadeh Aalai, Associate Professor of Psychology at Queensborough Community College at the City University of New York, discusses how faculty can design curricula that navigates these difficult histories in an impactful way. This event is part of the 2021-22 Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and National Endowment for the Humanities Colloquium entitled, “Incarceration, Transformation & Paths to Liberation during the Holocaust and Beyond and was co-sponsored by the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) at Queensborough Community College.

Holocaust Speaker Series
Click here to register and for more information about the series

In this intimate and meaningful experience, speakers present stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The Holocaust Speaker Series is held each Wednesday at 11:00am EST on Zoom. The series is hosted by the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust and Humanity Center and is sponsored by Margaret & Michael Valentine in partnership with the Harriet and Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage.

Select 2020-21 Event Recordings

Holocaust Memory & Commemorations

How Was It Possible?: Introduction to the Holocaust
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Under Siege Again? Holocaust Distortion and the Rise of Hate Crimes Against Jews
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Annual Kristallnacht Commemoration: November 1938 as a Turning Point?
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Nuremberg Laws: How the Nazis Were Influenced by U.S. Jim Crow Laws
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KHC Exhibit Talk: Women in the Nazi Concentration Camps
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KHC Exhibit Talk: LGBTQI+ People in the Nazi Concentration Camps
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2020-21 KHC-NEH Colloquium: Internment and Resistance

Creating a Concentration Camp Society: How Governments Push for Mass Detention and How People Resist
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Graphic Internment
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A Prisoner’s Voice: Poetry of Psychological Resistance
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Understanding the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising through the Theatrical Musical To Paint the Earth
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Italian Internment During World War II and the Limits of Racism in America 
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Oppression and Resistance in America’s World War II Concentration Camps
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Contain and Control: The American Obsession with the Black Body
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Poetry of Psychological Resistance at Auschwitz: The Words of Krystyna Zywulska
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Special Events

Voices from Srebrenica: Survivor Narratives of the Bosnian Genocide
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La Convivencia: Exploring Sephardic Music’s Traditions of Peace and Coexistence
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Intergenerational Trauma, Memory, and Stories Carried Forward
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Peacebuilding Through Awareness & Improvisation, Part 1
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Peacebuilding Through Awareness & Improvisation, Part 2
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Human Rights & the Museum Series

Indigenizing Institutions: A Conversation with Curator and Museum Worker, Taylor Payer 
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Queer Art, Curatorial Collaboration & Social Justice
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Acknowledgement and Survivance: The Impact of the Past and Ongoing Legacy in our Culture Now
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