Recordings

Making Global Connections

Scroll below for links to all of our recorded programs by semester and by theme. You can also explore our curated YouTube playlists by clicking here.


2021-22 Event Recordings

Holocaust Speaker Series
Michael A. Meyer, Ph.D.
Recorded on October 13, 2021
Link to recorded event is forthcoming

Michael A. Meyer was born in Berlin, Germany and grew up in Los Angeles. He has written numerous books, including The Origins of the Modern Jew: Jewish Identity and European Culture in Germany, 1749-1824Jewish Identity in the Modern World (1990); and he has published more than two hundred articles and longer reviews. In 2015, he received the Moses Mendelssohn Award “for lifelong dedication to teaching and publishing about German-Jewish history and culture” from the Leo Baeck Institute in New York. This ongoing series features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The series is organized by the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center, sponsored by Margaret and Michael Valentine, and presented in partnership with the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage.

Holocaust Speaker Series
Ruth Barnett
Recorded on October 13, 2021
Link to recorded event is forthcoming

Ruth tells the moving story of her mother, Irene Levin, who was born Josepha Weil in 1927. Josepha was a child of a large, prosperous, secular family in the Sudetenland, a German corridor of western Czechoslovakia. Josepha was just over eleven years old when her father died, and Hitler walked through the Sudetenland. By December 1941, Josepha, her mother, Irena, and stepfather, Georg, were deported to Terezin, where they spent over two years. Deportation to Auschwitz and slave labor at a sub-camp called Christianstadt followed. In 1947, Josepha immigrated to America and adopted her mother’s name, Irene. In 1949, Irene met and married her husband, Joe Levin, and raised three children. In 2017, as Ruth just retired from a career as a Quality Assurance professional, she brought Irene to live in Mason, Ohio. This ongoing series features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The series is organized by the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center, sponsored by Margaret and Michael Valentine, and presented in partnership with the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage.

Holocaust Speaker Series
Joyce Kamen
Recorded on October 6, 2021
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Joyce tells the remarkable story of the personal journey that she and her husband Fred have experienced since discovering in 2013 that Fred, who was adopted at birth, was the biological son of two Holocaust survivors. His mother Anna—then only 19—was living in Nazi-occupied Berlin when the war broke out. She was saved by a courageous Egyptian doctor. For over two years—and at great risk to his own life—Dr. Mohammed Helmy contrived an elaborate series of schemes to keep Anna from being deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Joyce, a semi-retired creative communications professional, conducted video interviews of nearly 40 of Cincinnati’s Holocaust survivors for the “Project Eternity” series, commissioned in the 1990s by Cincinnati’s Combined Generations of the Holocaust. This ongoing series features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The series is organized by the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center, sponsored by Margaret and Michael Valentine, and presented in partnership with the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage.

Holocaust Memory / Book Talk
A Single Photograph Reveals a Crime of the Holocaust
Book Talk with Dr. Wendy Lower, Author of The Ravine: A Family, a Photograph, a Holocaust Massacre Revealed
Recorded on October 6, 2021

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In 2009, Dr. Wendy Lower, John K. Roth Professor of History and Director, Mgrublian Center for Human Rights at Claremont McKenna College and the acclaimed author of Hitler’s Furies, as shown a photograph just brought to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. The documentation of the Holocaust is vast, but there are virtually no images of a Jewish family at the actual moment of murder, in this case by German officials and Ukrainian collaborators. A Ukrainian shooter’s rifle is inches from a woman’s head, obscured in a cloud of smoke. The woman is bending forward, holding the hand of a barefoot boy. And—only one of the shocking revelations of Wendy Lower’s brilliant ten-year investigation of this image—the photograph reveals the shins of another child, slipping from the woman’s lap. Dr. Lower’s gripping detective work—in Ukraine, Germany, Slovakia, Israel, and the United States—recovers astonishing layers of detail concerning the open-air massacres in Ukraine. The identities of the victims, of the killers—and, remarkably, of the photographer who openly took the picture, as a secret act of resistance—are dramatically uncovered. Finally, in the hands of this exceptional scholar, a single image unlocks a new understanding of the place of the family unit in the history and aftermath of Nazi genocide. This event is hosted by the Gross Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies at Ramapo College and is co-sponsored by the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at the US Military Academy at West Point, and the Gross Family Center for the Study of Antisemitism and the Holocaust.

Human Rights & the Museum Series
Museums as Places of Trauma and Healing: Processing Visitor Experiences
Recorded on September 30, 2021
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Memorial museums and atrocity site memorials dedicated to educating visitors about human rights violations and genocide can often become spaces that are emotionally triggering. Museum staff are tasked to design exhibits and programs that present these difficult histories while also helping visitors navigate the difficult feelings they may experience. And yet, the teams who work within these spaces on a daily basis can also become traumatized. In this conversation, Dr. Ereshnee Naidu-Silverman, Senior Program Director of the Global Transitional Justice Initiative at the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience, discusses historical trauma and the strategies museum workers use to create spaces of healing for themselves, as well as their visitors. This event is co-sponsored by the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center, Queensborough Community College’s Gallery and Museum Studies Program, and the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust and Humanity Center.

QCC Welcome Read Event
Illustrating the Civil Rights Movement: A Conversation with Nate Powell
Recorded on September 29, 2021
Link to recorded event is forthcoming

Join Nate Powell, illustrator of March: Book One, as he recounts his memories of working with John Lewis while illustrating the Congressman’s graphic memoir about the civil rights movement. This event is a collaboration between the Kupferberg Holocaust Center and QCC’s English Department, Pre-College Programs and the Center for Tutoring and Academic Support.

QCC Welcome Read Event
The Genre of Graphic Novel: Student Activism Then and Now
Recorded on September 23, 2021
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Join Queensborough Community College English department faculty members Dr. Robin Ford, Associate Professor of English, and Professor Sybil White for this two-part event about John Lewis’s graphic memoir, March: Book One. Dr. Ford discusses the form and history of the genre of graphic novels while Professor White facilitates a student-led discussion about John Lewis’s and students’ own social justice activism. This event is a collaboration between the Kupferberg Holocaust Center and QCC’s English Department, Pre-College Programs and the Center for Tutoring and Academic Support.

Holocaust Speaker Series
Matt Yosafat
Recorded on September 22, 2021
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Matt Yosafat was born in Katerini, Greece, in 1936. In 1942, he went into hiding with the Nazi occupation of Greece. The Yosafats hid in places including a cave and tobacco shelter, rarely safe and often separated. Ultimately, the Yosafat family reunited in Katerini and were liberated, but the outbreak of a civil war led the family to emigrate to the United States in 1951. In 1955, Matt met his wife, Anneliese—who had arrived in the United States with her family shortly after the war—and they were soon married in 1959. This ongoing series features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The series is organized by the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center, sponsored by Margaret and Michael Valentine, and presented in partnership with the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage.

KHC-NEH QCC Faculty Workshop
Holocaust Education and Transformational Learning
Recorded on September 22, 2021  
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This workshop explores how Holocaust education can be a catalyst for transformative learning in higher education. Using her research into the behavior of perpetrators and bystanders as a case study, Dr. Azadeh Aalai, Associate Professor of Psychology at Queensborough Community College at the City University of New York, discusses how faculty can design curricula that navigates these difficult histories in an impactful way. This event is part of the 2021-22 Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and National Endowment for the Humanities Colloquium entitled, “Incarceration, Transformation & Paths to Liberation during the Holocaust and Beyond and was co-sponsored by the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) at Queensborough Community College.

Holocaust Speaker Series
Roni Berenson
Recorded on September 15, 2021
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Roni Berenson was born in Berlin, Germany in 1931. At the age of 10, she and her family escaped Germany through Nazi-occupied France and into Spain before crossing the Atlantic aboard a freighter in August 1941. They arrived in New York City and settled in Cleveland, Ohio. The series is organized by the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center, sponsored by Margaret and Michael Valentine, and presented in partnership with the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage.

2020-21 Event Recordings

Understanding the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising through the Theatrical Musical To Paint the Earth
Recorded on May 16, 2021

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In memory of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, which took place in 1943 from April 19 to May 16, three local Holocaust Centers teamed up with the Richard Rodgers Award-winning musical, To Paint the Earth, to present a virtual program of music and narration that tells the story of the life of the Jewish Underground during this crucial period in Warsaw. The musical, which is based on memoirs and first-hand accounts, shows how even after individual hope is lost, a community can still rise and shout to the world, “We are here.” The program included a presentation by the writers, Daniel F. Levin and Jonathan Portera, a live performance by actress and singer Lauren Lebowitz, and an interview with Survivor and ghetto fighter Michael Smuss. This program is co-sponsored by the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County, the Kupferberg Holocaust Center at Queensborough Community College, and the Holocaust & Human Rights Education Center in White Plains.

Intergenerational Trauma, Memory, and Stories Carried Forward
Recorded on May 4, 2021
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How is trauma transmitted across generations and how do descendants of Holocaust survivors and other atrocities remember these events? Join Dr. Marianne Hirsch for a discussion about intergenerational trauma and memory. Dr. Hirsch coined the term “postmemory” to describe how descendants of Holocaust survivors experienced the trauma of their forebears. Using the lenses of visual culture and gender, Dr. Hirsch discussed how intergenerational trauma plays a role in the stories and memories that are carried forward and remembered. Dr. Hirsch is the William Peterfield Trent Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and Professor in the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. This event is hosted by the Nancy and David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center in Cincinnati and is presented in partnership with the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at the University of Minnesota; the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center at Queensborough Community College; Jewish Family Service of Cincinnati; the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage; and the Taft Health Humanities Research Group.

Peacebuilding Through Awareness & Improvisation, Part 2
Recorded on April 24, 2021

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This program is a celebration of a participatory action research methodology known as Social Presencing Theater (SPT), a body-based approach for sensing and enacting change. Because SPT is practiced in community, it positions our relational spaces, and the distinct cultures that emerge from them, as worthy of reflection and development. The “theater” in SPT refers to a shared place where something of significance is made visible. This workshop on “empathy to action” featuring CUNY students was developed in partnership with the Kupferberg Holocaust Center in 2019. Facilitators are members of QCC’s student and alumni practice group, including Arawana Hayashi, creator of Social Presencing Theater; Uri Noy Meir, an artist-facilitator co-creating social art across borders; Manish Srivastava, a global facilitator whose projects include partnering with UN agencies and NGO sectors; and CUNY-QCC Faculty members: Heather Huggins, advanced practitioner of SPT and Assistant Professor of Theatre, and Aviva Geismar, Associate Professor of Dance. This event is co-sponsored by Transformative Learning in the Humanities at the City University of New York (CUNY); the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center; the CUNY-QCC Mindfulness Club and Office of Student Activities“Thrive Series”; and the CUNY-QCC Visual and Performing Arts Academy.

A Prisoner’s Voice: Poetry of Psychological Resistance
Recorded on April 21, 2021

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Farewell, Auschwitz provides a glimpse into prisoner life in one of the darkest chapters of human history, and brings to life the power of music and poetry to bring light to despair. Krystyna Zywulska was a Polish political prisoner at the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination camp in Nazi-occupied Poland from 1943 to her escape in 1945. While imprisoned, Zywulska wrote lyrics and set them to familiar folk, classical, and popular tunes from the period, and prisoners performed the resulting songs and shared the words as a means of coping with the horrors of the camp. Before imprisonment, Zywulska had not written a single song; Nazi oppression appears to have inspired her creative blossoming.

Farewell, Auschwitz: Music by Jake Heggie; Text from poetry of Krystyna Zywulska, written at Auschwitz, 1943-1945; Jennifer Gliere, soprano, Roz Woll, mezzo-soprano, Steven Dahlke, baritone, Mirna Lekić, piano.

This event is part of the 2020-21 Harriet and Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and National Endowment for the Humanities Colloquium entitled, “Internment & Resistance: Confronting Mass Detention and Dehumanization.” This event is co-sponsored by the Queensborough Performing Arts Center (QPAC) and presented in partnership with the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center, Cincinnati.

Voices from Srebrenica: Survivor Narratives of the Bosnian Genocide
Recorded on April 15, 2021

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In the hills of eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina sits the small town of Srebrenica–once known for silver mines and health spas, now infamous for the genocide that occurred there during the Bosnian War. In July 1995, when the town fell to Serbian forces, 12,000 Muslim men and boys fled through the woods, seeking safe territory. Hunted for six days, more than 8,000 were captured, killed at execution sites and later buried in mass graves. In honor of Genocide Awareness Month, the authors of Voices from Srebrenica: Survivor Narratives of the Bosnian Genocide, discussed the practical and ethical challenges of working with heavily traumatized survivors; why it’s crucial to document their lives before, during, and after the war; as well as how and why the tragic lessons of the Holocaust remain relevant. Featuring Hasan Hasanović, head of research at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial and himself a genocide survivor, and Ann Petrila, professor of practice and coordinator of Global Initiatives at the University of Denver’s Graduate School of Social Work. This event is hosted by the Kupferberg Holocaust Center and is presented in partnership with The Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights at Rutgers University; The Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center in Cincinnati; The Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College; The Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies at the US Military Academy at West Point; The Harriman Institute at Columbia University; and The Genocide Studies Program at Yale University.

Indigenizing Institutions: A Conversation with Curator and Museum Worker, Taylor Payer 
Recorded on April 12, 2021

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Part of the Human Rights & the Museum Series
Join Kat Griefen, Program Coordinator and Faculty Member in Queensborough Community College’s Gallery and Museum Studies Program, for a conversation with Taylor Rose Payer, a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa. Taylor assists with developing relationships between the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College Library, and Native American and Indigenous communities built around collaborative and collections-based research. She earned her M.A. in Public Humanities from Brown University and B.A. in Women’s and Gender Studies from Dartmouth College. While in undergrad, Taylor interned at the Hood where she developed a deep interest in collections, art, and museum education. Since then, Taylor has had various curatorial, research, and education roles at the Rhode Island School of Design Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center, the Portland Art Museum, Socrates Sculpture Park, and the All My Relations Arts Gallery. This event is co-sponsored by the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and Gallery and Museum Studies Program in the Art & Design Department at Queensborough Community College.

Virtual Conference: The State of Roma Human Rights in the Balkans
Recorded on April 8, 2021

In honor of International Roma Day on April 8, 2021, the Harriman Institute and the Roma Peoples Project at Columbia University and the Kupferberg Holocaust Center hosted a conference on the state of Romani human rights in the Balkans. The aim was to review the contemporary state of human rights and the challenges that confront Roma people in the six Western Balkan countries seeking European Union membership. The conference brought together top Roma scholars in the academy, advocates, and practitioners who are working to advance the human rights and dignity of Roma people throughout the region.

Panel 1: The State of Romani Human Rights in Europe
Click here to watch the recording
Professor Margaeta Matache, Harvard School of Public Health
Professor Ethel Brooks, Rutgers University
Professor Tanya Domi, Harriman Institute, moderator

Panel 2: A Roma Educational Project in Bosnia and Herzegovina
Click here to watch the recording
Velma Sarić, President of the Post Conflict Research Center, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH)
Miloš Bogičević, Head of Human Rights, OSCE Mission to BiH
Mirko Pincelli, Photographer and filmmaker working on documenting the lives of Roma communities in BiH
Dalibor Tanić, Roma activist and Editor-in-Chief of UDAR, a regional Roma multimedia portal 
Dr. Laura Cohen, Executive Director, Kupferberg Holocaust Center, moderator

Panel 3: What is Going on in Europe and the Balkans?
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Goran Miletić, Europe Director, Civil Rights Defenders
Deniz Selmani, Co-Founder and Program Director of Romalitico Skopje; Obama Foundation Leader, Europe Program
Anna Orsos, Women’s Rights Officer, European Roma Rights Centre
Ðorđe Jovanović, President of the European Roma Rights Centre
Professor Tanya Domi, Harriman Institute, moderator

Remembering the Town Known as Auschwitz: Yom HaShoah Commemoration
Recorded on April 8, 2021

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The Rabbi Isidoro Aizenberg Memorial Lecture
In commemoration of Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day, Tomasz Kuncewicz and Maciek Zabierowski from the Auschwitz Jewish Center in Oswiecim, Poland discuss about the complexities of educating people about the Holocaust in a town that is synonymous with the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination and concentration camp in what was formerly Nazi-occupied Poland during WWII. The Auschwitz Jewish Center Foundation was established in 1995 in order to rebuild a Jewish cultural, spiritual, and educational center in Oswiecim. In September 2000, the Auschwitz Jewish Center opened its doors to visitors from all over the world. It is a non-governmental organization which exists to serve as a guardian of Jewish memory, as well as to educate the public about the Holocaust. Since August, 2006, the Center has been affiliated with the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust in New York, USA. This event was co-sponsored by the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center at Queensborough Community College; the Center for Jewish Studies at Queens College; and the Museum of Jewish Heritage.

KHC Exhibit Talk: Women in the Nazi Concentration Camps
Recorded on April 7, 2021

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Join Dr. Azadeh Aalai, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Queensborough Community College at the City University of New York, for a discussion about the intersection between gender and persecution, including how victimization varied for male versus female Jews. The role women played not only as victims but also as perpetrators and rescuers during the Holocaust is explored, with a specific focus on the concentration camp experience. This lecture includes a special look at the KHC’s original online exhibition, The Concentration Camps: Inside the Nazi System of Incarceration and Genocide.

KHC Exhibit Talk: LGBTQI+ People in the Nazi Concentration Camps
Recorded on March 24, 2021

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Join Dr. Danny Sexton, Associate Professor of English at Queensborough Community College at the City University of New York, for a conversation about the different ways the Nazis persecuted gay, lesbian, and transgender people throughout World War II, including how these communities were singled out for abuse in the concentration camp system. This lecture includes a special look at the KHC’s original online exhibition, The Concentration Camps: Inside the Nazi System of Incarceration and Genocide.

La Convivencia: Exploring Sephardic Music’s Traditions of Peace and Coexistence
Recorded on March 17, 2021
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The musical project, La Convivencia, is inspired by the powerful message of coexistence. It is based on Sephardic traditions of different countries visited by Sephardic Jews, traveling through history after the expulsion from Spain. Used to peaceful coexistence, Sephardic Jews observed the traditions of their home countries, and infused Jewish culture into the music of their adopted lands. This resulted in musical similarities. For example, Bosnians and Sephardic Jews use the same scales and rhythms. They share the same emotion in their songs, the same pleasures, and the same pain. In the end they share the same country, the same customs, the same food…and they learn from each other. La Convivencia reminds us that we need to do more in emphasizing the values of respect across all faiths, and it inspires us to be peaceful ambassadors of its message of acceptance for all. This event is co-sponsored by the Department of Music at Queensborough Community College, the Queensborough Performing Arts Center (QPAC), and the Harriman Institute at Columbia University.

Peacebuilding Through Awareness & Improvisation, Part 1
Recorded on March 12, 2021

Click here to watch the recorded event

This program is a celebration of a participatory action research methodology known as Social Presencing Theater (SPT), a body-based approach for sensing and enacting change. Because SPT is practiced in community, it positions our relational spaces, and the distinct cultures that emerge from them, as worthy of reflection and development. The “theater” in SPT refers to a shared place where something of significance is made visible. This workshop focuses on “empathy to action” which CUNY students developed in partnership with the Kupferberg Holocaust Center in 2019. Facilitators are members of QCC’s student and alumni practice group, including Jessica Kreisler and Yineng Ye, Global Citizenship Alliance alumni; Arawana Hayashi, creator of Social Presencing Theater; Uri Noy Meir, an artist-facilitator co-creating social art across borders; Manish Srivastava, a global facilitator whose projects include partnering with UN agencies and NGO sectors; and CUNY-QCC Faculty members: Heather Huggins, advanced practitioner of SPT and Assistant Professor of Theatre, and Aviva Geismar, Associate Professor of Dance. This event is co-sponsored by Transformative Learning in the Humanities at the City University of New York (CUNY); the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center; the CUNY-QCC Mindfulness Club and Office of Student Activities“Thrive Series”; and the CUNY-QCC Visual and Performing Arts Academy.

Graphic Internment 
Recorded on March 10, 2021
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Join two faculty members from Queensborough Community College’s English Department for a conversation about the internment of Japanese-Americans in the United States during WWII. John Yi, Lecturer, discusses QCC’s 2020-21 Common Read text, George Takei’s graphic novel, They Called Us Enemy, while Dr. Aliza Atik, Associate Professor, reviews Mine Okubo’s Prisoner 13660. This lecture is part of the 2020-21 Harriet and Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and National Endowment for the Humanities Colloquium entitled, “Internment & Resistance: Confronting Mass Detention and Dehumanization and both books are related to the KHC’s original exhibition, “The Concentration Camps: Inside the Nazi System of Incarceration and Genocide.” This event is co-sponsored by Queensborough Community College’s Art & Design Department and the Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning (CETL).

Queer Art, Curatorial Collaboration & Social Justice: A Conversation with Carmen Hermo and Levi Narine
Recorded on March 8, 2021
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Part of the Human Rights & the Museum Series
This event featured Carmen Hermo, Associate Curator for the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, and Levi Narine, former Teen Program Assistant, InterseXtions & Special Projects at the Brooklyn Museum, in conversation with Kat Griefen, Program Coordinator and Faculty Member in QCC’s Gallery and Museum Studies Program. Both Hermo and Narine were members of the curatorial team for Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: 50 Years After Stonewall. Levi Narine is the former Teen Program Assistant, InterseXtions & Special Projects at the Brooklyn Museum. He organized Our House, the Resource Room of Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall Exhibition, as well as worked with InterseXtions, the Brooklyn Museum’s LGBTQIA+ Teen Program. Carmen Hermo is the Associate Curator for the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. She curated Roots of The Dinner Party: History in the Making (2017), formed part of the Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall curatorial collective (2019), and co-organized Half the Picture: A Feminist Look at the Collection (2018), among many other exhibitions. Previously, Carmen was Assistant Curator for Collections at the Guggenheim Museum. This event is co-sponsored by the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center; the Gallery and Museum Studies Program in the Art & Design Department; and the Office of Student Activities at Queensborough Community College.

Italian Internment During World War II and the Limits of Racism in America 
Recorded on March 3, 2021
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Even before the United States and Italy went to war, various fascist and anti-fascist efforts impacted Italian Americans. During the war over a half a million Italian citizens living in the US (not American citizens) had to register as enemy aliens, thousands were forced to resettle, and a small number were interned. In the same era Italian soldiers and merchant marines were imprisoned throughout the United States. Well before the war with Italy would end, the US government lifted restrictions on Italian citizens in this country and, later still, the status of many Italian POWs also changed. The differing ways Italians and Italian Americans were treated in the US were not only influenced by political concerns but also by practices of xenophobia and racism, a point made especially clear in comparison to the experiences of Japanese Americans. And yet, better understanding the multiple realities of Italians in the US in this era helps complicate our sense of how race and ethnicity shapes experiences in wartime and in peace. Dr. Laura Ruberto, Humanities professor at Berkeley City College, reflects on how political pressure, cultural visibility, and an emerging position of whiteness helped build public acceptance of this immigrant community. This lecture is part of the 2020-21 Harriet and Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and National Endowment for the Humanities Colloquium entitled, “Internment & Resistance: Confronting Mass Detention and Dehumanization,” and is presented in partnership with the John D. Calandra Italian American Institute at Queens College-CUNY and the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center, Cincinnati.

Oppression and Resistance in America’s World War II Concentration Camps
Recorded on February 24, 2021
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Many historians and Japanese Americans cite the loss of US citizenship rights as the biggest injustice of the camps, and many believe cooperation and not resistance was the norm. Dr. Gary Okihiro, Professor Emeritus of international and public affairs at Columbia University and a Visiting Professor of American studies at Yale University, discusses the nature of the oppression in that historical experience, and the resistance posed to those oppressive acts. This lecture is part of the 2020-21 Harriet and Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and National Endowment for the Humanities Colloquium entitled, “Internment & Resistance: Confronting Mass Detention and Dehumanization,” and is presented in partnership with the Asian American / Asian Research Institute-CUNY and the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center, Cincinnati.

Under Siege Again? Holocaust Distortion and the Rise of Hate Crimes Against Jews
Recorded on January 27, 2021
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To commemorate International Holocaust Remembrance Day and the 76th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination and concentration camp, six Holocaust education centers in the New York region co-sponsored a conversation about how antisemitism at the international, national, and regional levels fuels Holocaust distortion, as well as the challenges in prosecuting religiously-based hate crimes locally. Featuring Michael Brovner, Chief of the Queens County District Attorney’s Hate Crimes Bureau in New York City, and Mark Weitzman, Director of Government Affairs at the Simon Wiesenthal Center. This event was co-sponsored by the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center at Queensborough Community College; the Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College; the Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies at the US Military Academy at West Point; the Holocaust & Human Rights Education Center in White Plains; the Holocaust Museum & Center for Tolerance & Education at Rockland Community College; and the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County.

Acknowledgement and Survivance: The Impact of the Past and Ongoing Legacy in our Culture Now
Recorded on November 20, 2020
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In recognition of National Native American Heritage Month, join Gina Adams (Ojibwa, Lakota, Irish, and Lithuanian descent), artist and Assistant Professor at Emily Carr University of Art & Design in discussion with Danyelle Means (Oglala Lakota), Director of Institutional Advancement at the Institute of American Indian Arts and the co-curator of the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center’s past exhibition, Survivance & Sovereignty on Turtle Island. This conversation focuses on Adams’s “Broken Treaties Project,” and how it intertwines history, culture, and memory. Artist and curator will also be in dialogue about the meaning of survival through remembrance, the significance of expressing it artistically, and its relevance to Holocaust education today. Presented by the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center and the Museum & Gallery Studies Program in the Art & Design Department at QCC in partnership with the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center; the Peace & Conflict Studies Programs at the University of Manitoba; and the Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies at the University of Minnesota.

Holocaust Speaker Series: Ellen Bottner
Recorded on November 18, 2020
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This series features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. Ellen Bottner, a Holocaust survivor, grew up in Germany under the Third Reich. She describes her experiences on the Kindertransport, life under refuge with a foster family in England, the fate of her extended family during the Holocaust, and reflections about intolerance in the world today. Presented by the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center in partnership with the KHC and Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage. Sponsored by Margaret and Michael Valentine.

Contain and Control: The American Obsession with the Black Body
Recorded on November 18, 2020

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An overview of the ways the bodies of Black Americans have been represented in the dominant (white) American culture from slavery to the current moment of mass incarceration and over-policing reveals the tension between an impulse to destroy and the desire to exploit. In American imagery and reality, Black bodies are trapped by the cruel paradox of being treated as simultaneously expendable and profitable. Dr. Agnieszka Tuszynska, Associate Professor of English at Queensborough Community College, offers examples from visual culture, literature, and legal history to illustrate how myths and stereotypes about Black people have been used to justify various forms of control and containment of Black lives. Presented in partnership with the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center.

Creating a Concentration Camp Society: How Governments Push for Mass Detention and How People Resist
Recorded on November 12, 2020

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The development of the German concentration camp system reveals how ruling parties engineer mass detention of civilians without trial. While the horrors of Nazi extermination camps remain unique in history, the first several years of German concentration camps parallel how governments in other places and times have adopted mass detention for similar political purposes. Join Andrea Pitzer, author and journalist, for a discussion about what gives rise to camps, including why their use expanded exponentially in the last decade, and what strategies have been successful in opposing them. Presented in partnership with the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center.

Holocaust Speaker Series: Rosette Teitel
Recorded on November 11, 2020
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This series features Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors sharing stories of life before, during, and after the Holocaust. Rosette Teitel, a Holocaust survivor, was born in France, and hidden by Catholic farmers while her mother was a part of the French Underground. Unaware of her Jewish heritage until she was older, she discusses her struggle with her identity, her mother’s resistance experience, and life during wartime. Presented by the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center in partnership with the KHC and Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage. Sponsored by Margaret and Michael Valentine.

Annual Kristallnacht Commemoration: November 1938 as a Turning Point?
Recorded on November 10, 2020
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Join Dr. Peter Hayes for the 12th Frederick M. Schweitzer Lecture, “November 1938 as a Turning Point?”. Dr. Hayes’ talk focuses on the November 1938 incident known as Kristallnacht, when Nazis in Germany set fire to synagogues, vandalized Jewish homes, schools, and businesses and killed close to 100 Jews. In the aftermath of Kristallnacht, also called the “Night of Broken Glass,” approximately 30,000 Jewish men were arrested and sent to Nazi concentration camps. There is a short performance by the West Point Jewish Chapel Choir before the lecture. This year’s event is co-sponsored by the KHC; the Holocaust, Genocide, and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College; and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at West Point Academy.

In the Moment: A Discussion About the Nagorno-Karabakh Conflict
Recorded on November 5, 2020

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As Armenia and Azerbaijan clash over the embattled region of Nagorno-Karabakh, hundreds have died in the most serious escalation of fighting in years. According to the Associated Press, the Armenian military continues to rely mostly on aging Soviet-built weapons, while Azerbaijan has revamped its arsenal with attack drones and long-range multiple rocket systems supplied by its neighbor and ally, Turkey. Many Armenian-Americans have called on the U.S. government to condemn Azerbaijan and Turkey for the conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh, fearing there is an attempt to continue what was started in the 1915 Armenian Genocide. Join Verjine Adanalian, attorney and third-generation Armenian Genocide descendant, for a discussion about this complex conflict, as well as why Americans should be informed about it. Presented in partnership with the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center and the World Affairs Council – Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky.

Nuremberg Laws: How the Nazis Were Influenced by U.S. Jim Crow Laws
Recorded on
October 22, 2020
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Learn about the intersections between the Nuremberg Laws in Nazi Germany and eugenics laws and Jim Crow practices in the United States in this program featuring Tom White, Coordinator of Educational Outreach for the Cohen Center for Holocaust Studies at Keene State College in New Hampshire. White will discuss how the Nazis looked to discriminatory policies in the United States, including the Jim Crow Laws, as they constructed their own racial policies targeting Jews during the Holocaust. Presented in partnership with the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center and National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

Poetry of Psychological Resistance at Auschwitz: The Words of Krystyna Zywulska
Recorded on October 21, 2020
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Dr. Barbara Milewski, Associate Professor of Music at Swartmore College, presents her research on the remarkable life and resistance poetry of Krystyna Zywulska, a Polish political prisoner at the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination camp in Nazi-occupied Poland from 1943 until her escape in 1945. While imprisoned at Auschwitz, Zywulska wrote dozens of poems and songs, which were shared among camp prisoners, and which use a multi-layered approach of satire, stark realism, and optimism to paint a vivid picture of life in Auschwitz. Zywulska’s poetry helped to provide some solace of the heart to camp prisoners, played a role in her survival, and shines a light on the complex world of oppressors, the oppressed, and artistic instruments of psychological resistance, testimony, and hope.

How was it Possible?: Introduction to the Holocaust
Recorded on
October 15, 2020
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How was the Holocaust possible? This program will provide an introduction to the Holocaust through an exploration of the factors leading to the rise of Nazism. Jodi Elowitz, Director of Education and Engagement at the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center, will discuss the origins of the Holocaust, including the aftermath of World War I and the impact of antisemitism and nationalism in the rise of Nazism and its spread throughout Europe. If you’ve ever wondered how the events of World War II and the Holocaust began, this program will help answer those questions and demonstrate the need for all of us to be vigilant in the face of hatred today. Presented in partnership with the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center and the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage.